You are here
The Missing and Murdered: Indigenous Women Forgotten in the Americas Human Rights 

The Missing and Murdered: Indigenous Women Forgotten in the Americas

(RustBelt) – Last night I attended a vigil held for the memory of Savanna Greywind, a Fargo, ND Indigenous woman, who was brutally murdered allegedly by her neighbors in an attempt to steal her baby. She was eight months pregnant when she was killed, and her body was found, wrapped in plastic and duct-tape, in the Red River. A newborn baby girl, believed to be Savanna’s, was discovered shortly before at the neighbor’s apartment. This particular story isn’t unfamiliar. It’s an unfortunate truth that mentally warped individuals with no consciences occasionally target pregnant women for their babies. What did surprise me Read More

Read More
Mexico’s Indigenous Peoples Select a Woman to Represent Their Resistance in Upcoming Presidential Election Politics 

Mexico’s Indigenous Peoples Select a Woman to Represent Their Resistance in Upcoming Presidential Election

Mexico (GV) – In a historic decision for Mexico, the country’s indigenous peoples appointed María de Jesús Patricio Martínez as spokeswoman for the National Indigenous Governing Council, with the intent for her to run as an independent candidate in the upcoming presidential elections of 2018. The various communities selected her on May 28, 2017, while gathered together at the National Indigenous Congress (CNI, for its initials in Spanish), which was backed by leftist political group Zapatista Army of National Liberation. La compañera María de Jesús Patricio Martinez es la Vocera del Concejo Indígena de Gobierno #CNI #CIG pic.twitter.com/ROLJUBrvu5 — SubVersiones AAC (@SubVersionesAAC) May 28, Read More

Read More
An Epic Kyrgyz Poem Set To Music And Sung By A Woman Is Making Waves Music 

An Epic Kyrgyz Poem Set To Music And Sung By A Woman Is Making Waves

Kyrgyz artist Gulzada Ryskulova has rocked the local music scene with a powerful take on an epic poem that serves as a fundament of the Central Asian country’s culture.

Reciters of the Manas epic, or manaschi, are guardians of an oral folklore whose origins remain obscure. They are also almost always men.

Sent underground during the Soviet Union, the tradition of charismatic oral poetry themed on the life of a mythical warrior king received a powerful shot in the arm during the rule of Kyrgyzstan’s first president Askar Akayev.

Now, with the release of a song based on the epic and sung by a woman, the tale of Manas has a new twist, now carrying an urgent message about the need to preserve the country’s incredible nature and its nomadic heritage.

Read More