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Women and war: after Afghanistan, there’s a chance to deploy gender-led approaches to conflict Culture 

Women and war: after Afghanistan, there’s a chance to deploy gender-led approaches to conflict

United Kingdom (Conversation) – As a member of the Royal Navy, I never really thought that being a woman affected my work. Whether I was making safety decisions about flying helicopters or participating in operational planning, my contribution was listened to and respected. I wasn’t sidelined or disadvantaged for being a woman in a military largely populated by men. I was just one of the team. I joined Britannia Royal Naval College straight from school so I grew up in the institution. As a young recruit, I knuckled down to basic training and got on with it, accepting the Read More

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Forgetting About Girls in Afghanistan – Again Featured Human Rights 

Forgetting About Girls in Afghanistan – Again

Afghanistan (HRW) – Robot Visits US, Afghan Girls Stuck at Home We want to make a difference and most breakthroughs in science, technology, and other industries normally start with the dream of a child to do something great. – Team Afghanistan’s statement on the competition website They seized the chance to study in a country that has long denied that advantage to many girls. They excelled in science and technology – a male-dominated field. And they competed successfully to represent their country against some of the brightest young minds in the world. But, after overcoming these improbable odds, a robotics team of six Afghan girls Read More

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National Geographic’s Iconic ‘Afghan Girl’ May Face 14 Years in Pakistan Prison Featured Scandal 

National Geographic’s Iconic ‘Afghan Girl’ May Face 14 Years in Pakistan Prison

Sharbat Gula, who became famous worldwide on the cover of National Geographic magazine in 1985, is facing deportation or 14 years in prison in Pakistan for allegedly falsifying documents.

The Afghan woman, whose haunting green eyes were immortalized in a National Geographic cover photo when she was 12 years old, was arrested last week in Peshawar, Pakistan, for allegedly possessing a fake ID and staying illegally in Pakistan, officials said. If convicted, she could be deported or jailed for up to 14 years, according to Zia Awan, a human rights lawyer based in Karachi.

Pakistan, and the Peshawar area in particular, has been refuge for more than a million people who escaped Russia’s war with Afghanistan. But Pakistan has been forcing those refugees to leave, setting a deadline of March. But, as Afghanistan continues to be torn by violence, many are refusing to go home.

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